August 18, 2017

Fall Kodak Moments

I can’t figure out how to delete this box. Please excuse it’s lack of aesthetic flow.

For this week’s post, I gathered some pictures from the past five weeks of school to share with you. I’ve realized that I’ve taken a lot of pictures so far, but have not posted nearly as many as I would’ve liked to. I do have to apologize because the pictures do not follow a chronological order. Not only do I hope you enjoy these pictures, but please make sure you enjoy this wonderful weather!

 

Commas save lives. There's a pretty obvious difference between saying "Let's eat Grandma" and Let's eat, Grandma." Using this newfound humor and the book "Eats, Shoots & Leaves" by Lynne Truss, we started-or continued- the lifelong process of not only learning how important commas are, but how we need to use them correctly.

Commas save lives. There’s a pretty obvious difference between saying, “Let’s eat Grandma” and, “Let’s eat, Grandma.” Using this newfound humor and the book “Eats, Shoots & Leaves” by Lynne Truss, we started-or I should say continued- the lifelong process of not only learning how important commas are, but how we need to use them correctly.

 

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What does reading look? For Karly, she loves reading “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” As she reads the book, she listens to the chapters that are available on YouTube to help her further understand the complex and vivid imagery and vocabulary of J.K. Rowling’s style of writing.

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For Jack, reading looks like this: awkwardly slumped on a counter, balanced on a stool, and checking out some nonfiction text.

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E.C.O. (Ecology in the Classroom and Outdoors) has visited us twice. During E.C.O.’s second visit, students practiced using GPS devices to plot coordinates all over the school’s grounds.

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This is one of the many charts in our classroom that help us learn how to be stronger writers. Students are encouraged to look at these charts again, and again, and again, and again in order to fully understand the concept that we discussed the day we hung up the chart. We used an excerpt from Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis to see how and why we write in paragraphs.

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This is one of the many charts in our classroom that help us learn how to be stronger writers. Students are encouraged to look at these charts again, and again, and again, and again in order to fully understand the concept that we discussed the day we hung up the chart. We used an excerpt from Wonder by R.J. Palacio to see how writers can write in a storyteller’s voice, because writers don’t just want to tell, they want to write in such a way that they show the readers. We then penned the term “storyshower” instead of “storyteller.” This was cool, but it backfired just a touch when we pronounced it shou/er instead of show/er.

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The week of October 7th was Fire Safety Awareness Week in honor of the Great Chicago Fire. Volunteers from the Corbett Fire Department came in and reviewed the importance of fire safety and showed the class some equipment. Here, Firefighter Anthony Calcagno, Allison’s dad, places a neck brace on Lindsay so we could see, and so Lindsay could feel, what it looks like.

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For Writer’s Workshop, we oftentimes like to share our small moments story with the class. We had an opportunity to go into Mr. Lewis’s class and share some of our stories. In this picture, Allison is reading aloud one of her small moment stories.

 

For our study of international artists in art, our class started with making prints in the style of Chilean wood-block artist Santos Chavéz.

For our study of international artists in art, our class started with making prints in the style of Chilean wood-block artist Santos Chávez. Chávez made prints that had a huge focus on elements of nature.

 

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For Writer’s Workshop, we oftentimes like to share our small moments story with the class. We had an opportunity to go into Mr. Lewis’s class and share some of our stories. In this picture, Noah is reading aloud one of his small moment stories.

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E.C.O. (Ecology in the Classroom and Outdoors) has visited us twice. During their first visit, our activity for the day focused on removing invasive species from the Outdoor Classroom using shovels and clippers.

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Scott Burns, Geologist Extraordinaire, visited our school to give a presentation on the Missoula Floods. He then came into every classroom to answer specific questions. In this picture, he’s helping David identify what type of fossil he dug on our Journey Through Time field study.

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Here is Scott giving his presentation to all the intermediate classes. It’s important to note that it was impossible to get a clear picture of him because he never stopped moving.

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In this picture, Terra and Ben are working on their History of Earth timelines. Each child created a timeline on the history of the earth from 4.5 billion years ago to today.

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Last week, we were honored by a visit from my mother, a high school librarian, lover of food, nature, traveling, children’s literature aficionado, and sewing. Traveling from Vermont, Mom came and spent a day with our class. She loves flying so much that she brought a bag full of books to donate to our classroom, because why not schlep another bag through the airport…? Here she is presenting some books that she donated to our classroom after she read my baby book to the class. Also of note here is Liam developing photobombing skills at an early age.

 

Dan Barnard About Dan Barnard

Dan Barnard hails from the Green Mountain State of Vermont where he grew up skiing, biking, and exploring the nooks and crannies of the woods. He learned to drive on his parents' station wagons, learned to ski at Smugglers' Notch, and developed a love for traveling by participating in school trips to France and New York City. He worked in many jobs ranging from ski instructing to babysitting to an after-school program that helped him decide he wanted to be a teacher.

He enrolled in Wheelock College in Boston, Massachusetts and earned a BA in Humanities with a focus on history and a concentration in Elementary Education. After working for two years in a suburban Boston community as a fifth grade teacher, he decided to move west to discover the beauty and bounty of Oregon. He worked for four years as a third, fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teacher in Mosier, Oregon. While working in Mosier he enrolled in graduate school at Portland State University and earned a MS in Curriculum and Instruction from Portland State University.